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Showing posts from 2016

DB7 - Wheel Bearing Woes

Upon removal of the driver's side knuckle I discovered that the driver's side wheel bearing sounded awful. It was definitely time to replace it. Knowing full well what was involved in this process, it was time to find or buy a press. I called up my buddy at Parts European to see if I could use their press to get this taken care of. Zach obliged and even offered to give me a hand.

Removing the wheel bearing from Leslie requires several things. First, you have to physically remove the front spindle. This was easy as I already had everything apart while changing the front ball joints.

If you don't have the luxury of a vise, go buy one. Ha! Or make a jig out of an old end table and then take twice the amount of time it would have taken if you would have stopped and bought a vise. Not a cheap vise either, a good, solid, old school one. One that is so heavy it will make the back of your car sag when you put it in the trunk. A vise from the days when steel was actually real. Alrig…

DB7 - Outer Tie Rod Ends & Lower Ball Joint Removal/Install

What are we doing today:
Removal of the tie rods, lower ball joint removal.

Tie Rod Tools needed:
14mm socketSocket Wrench19mm Flat WrenchOuter Tie Rod End Removal:
Before we move or remove the outer tie rod, mark them with a colorful permanent marker. This will help line them closely back up when we are finished reinstalling the new ones. I also took a few measurements with my calipers. From the center of the ball joint head to the end of the threads, accounting for the difference in lock nut size.
Getting them close just helps you from ripping off your tires when you drive for an alignment. Which you will of course have to get at some point in the near future. 
Removal of the tie rod. 19mm flat wrench for the inner and 19mm for the outer. The wrench on the inner to help support it while you break the outer loose. Once the otter tie rod is loose spin it off. 
Comparison, old to new. 

This is where compensation for the lengths comes in to play.


Lower Ball Joint Tools Needed: Rented C-Clam…

Paint and Prep - Lower Control Arms and Springs

In between working on things I took a little time to clean up the front springs and perches as well. This is definitely not necessary but, it is always fun to make something fresher. Plus you get to practice your spray paint skills a bit, and that is always fun.
Tools needed: Wire brushDe-RusterRubberized Undercoating SprayOld Paint BrushRustoleum Semi-Flat black spray paintAlcohol or Brake Cleaner
Let's get to it.
Purple Power De-Ruster works like a champ for your rusty projects.
These Neuspeed race springs need some love. These came off a car that was from Florida originally. So, the elements have eaten off that factory yellow coating a bit. I rubbed the up with the wire brush for a while.
Brush on the de-ruster and let it work. You will see it fizzle for a little while. After a bit it turns in to a black paintable surface. 
After that clean them off well with Alcohol or Brake Cleaner. Anything that leaves a residue will not help the rubberized undercoating stick. I learned the h…

DB7 - Removal of stock bushings, Installing poly bushings

Things to note:
This is part 3 of this particular write up. Please see, part 1 and 2 for further details and to get caught up to this point.

Please note before you start this project, to remove the upper and lower ball joints you will need a very large C-Clamp that can be rented from the auto parts or a press. There is also a specific socket adapter kit you must also rent in order to use that C-Clamp method. Honda's have interesting front control arms that won't allow you to push that ball joint out with out. In my case, I have a 4 point 66mm impact socket that worked just fine. If not, I would have needed to rent the secondary kit that comes with the extra adapters.

This kit from Advanced Auto looks like it comes with everything: Powerbuilt Tools Ball Joint...

The scope of this project was to replace:
Lower control arm bushings.
Lower shock mount bushings.
Tie rod ends.
Lower ball joints.
Upper ball joints.
Sway bar end links.
Upper, inner, A-arm bushings.

What are we doing th…

DB7 - Remove the Stabilizer Arms

Things to note:
Please note before you start this project, to remove the upper and lower ball joints you will need a very large C-Clamp that can be rented from the auto parts or a press. There is also a specific socket adapter kit you must also rent in order to use that C-Clamp method. Honda's have interesting front control arms that won't allow you to push that ball joint out with out. In my case, I have a 4 point 66mm impact socket that worked just fine. If not, I would have needed to rent the secondary kit that comes with the extra adapters.

This kit from Advanced Auto looks like it comes with everything: Powerbuilt Tools Ball Joint...

The scope of this project was to replace:
Lower control arm bushings.
Lower shock mount bushings.
Tie rod ends.
Lower ball joints.
Upper ball joints.
Sway bar end links.
Upper, inner, A-arm bushings.

What are we doing: Alright, so we got the lower control arms off. Time to pull the stabilizers down.
Tools needed: 5mm Allen Wrench (sway bar end l…

DB7 - Remove Spindle, Brake Caliper, and Lower Control Arms

This project turned in to a lengthy one for a variety of reasons. However, it was quite enjoyable all the way through. My initial thought was to make this one giant post in regards to replacing the whole front end. That is not going to work as there is just too much so I decided to break it up in to smaller chunks. If I would have done this before I'd probably a few more posts out there. Anyways, let begin.
Things to note: Please note before you start this project, to remove the upper and lower ball joints you will need a very large C-Clamp that can be rented from the auto parts or a press. There is also a specific socket adapter kit you must also rent in order to use that C-Clamp method. Honda's have interesting front control arms that won't allow you to push that ball joint out with out. In my case, I have a 4 point 66mm impact socket that worked just fine. If not, I would have needed to rent the secondary kit that comes with the extra adapters.

This kit from Advanced Au…